Launch of ‘Comms for a Cause’ initiative

We at NIRC are pleased to announce launch of ‘Comms for a Cause’ initiative whereby we will be financially supporting some projects/campaigns/causes that are working to bring about smiles on the faces of the needy.

We will be donating some proportion of profit from our projects/events to these campaigns extending our commitment towards corporate social responsibility.

For further queries, please write to us at info@nepalcomms.org.

Training Programme on Grant Proposal Writing: Batch Three

Nepal Institute of Research and Communications (NIRC) announces its 3rd batch of 2-day training on Grant Proposal Writing. The training is particularly targeted for early career development professionals who are interested to enhance their skills in developing grant proposals for their development projects/programmes.

The training will be held on December 8 and 9, 2018 at Sap Falcha, Babarmahal, Kathmandu.

Participation fee: 2000 NPR per person (to be paid at the venue on December 8)

Training Schedule:

Day ONE

Sessions Duration Time Slot
Registration and Tea/Coffee 15 minutes 10:30 – 10:45
Introduction to the course objectives and participants 15 minutes 10:45 – 11:00
Grant Proposal Writing – An Introduction 15 minutes 11:00 – 11:30
Call for Proposals and Preparing a Response 30 minutes 11:30 – 12:00
Key Elements of a bid proposal and things to consider before preparing for  bid development 30 minutes 12:00 – 12:30
Components of a Technical Proposal (Introduction/Background, Understanding of the Context, Understanding of the ToR, Study Design, Implementation Plan) 90 minutes 12:30 – 14:00
Lunch Break 30 minutes 14:00 – 14:30
Components of a Technical Proposal contd… (Team Compoistion and Project Governance, Quality Assurance Mechanism, Risk Assessment and Mitigation Strategies, Monitoring and Evaluation Framework, Annexes) 60 minutes 14:30– 15:30
Developing Conceptual Framework (Individual task and presentation) 60 minutes 15:30 – 16:30
Wrap Up 30 minutes 16:30 – 17:00

 

Day TWO

Sessions Duration Time Slot
Reflection of Day One and briefing on practical session 15 minutes 11:00 – 11:15
Practical session on Technical Proposal writing 60 minutes 11:15 – 12:15
Presentation and reflection on technical proposal writing 30 minutes 12:15 – 12:45
Components of a Financial Proposal (Implementation Budget, HR Budget, Budget Summary) 60 minutes 12:45 – 13:45
Lunch Break 15 minutes 13:45 – 14:15
Developing EOIs and Concept Notes; Difference between EOIs, Concept Notes and Full Proposals 45 minutes 14:15 – 15:00
Packaging a bid (Finalising Technical and Financial Proposal; Bid Submission Procedures) 75 minutes 15:00 – 16:00
Final reflection of training, certificate distribution, closing remarks 30 minutes 16:00 – 16:30
Wrap Up 30 minutes 16:30 – 17:00

 

Registration Link:

To register for the training, kindly fill up this form available in this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1SHKSKW2xPnC6WdBfxo_01EIN5-5Fdg8zcJdWLS2x6aU/edit?fbclid=IwAR0On77AypcGTKp4g621JSYxnhx2CyblZ4SmtC5T4GraP_Pp9l2AM1uFy5w

Procedures for the Use of Social Media by Government Agencies 2075

The Government of Nepal, specifically through Ministry of Communication and Information Technology (MoCIT) has come up with the Procedures for the Use of Social Media by Government Agencies 2075’ as a guiding document for government agencies to operate and manage social media accounts.

Here are some of the highlights from the document based on unofficial translation by NIRC team.

Operation and Management of Twitter Accounts

  • All government agencies need to open up Twitter account and bring into operation.
  • Official emails should be used for username. For eg for Office of Prime Minister and Council of Ministers officials, undersecretary@opmcm.gov.np).
  • For the profile picture of the handle, official logo of the agency or of the Government of Nepal needs to be used.
  • The cover image of the handle should distinctly represent the government agency.
  • The twitter bio should provide complete official information about the agency (such as full name, objectives, website address).
  • Name of the handle should appropriately represent the government agency.
  • The concerned agency needs to apply for account verification after some time of the operation of the handle.
  • Twitter should be used on a daily and regular basis.
  • All grievances and comments received should be regularly monitored; for sensitive and urgent matters, immediate appropriate action needs to be taken by concerned officials.
  • All notices and information should be posted in the Twitter handle on timely and regular basis.
  • All features – like, tweet, retweet, quote reply could be appropriately used by the officials.
  • Tweets, replies, retweets demeaning any individuals or causing negative effect upon them should be avoided.
  • While replying to any tweets, appropriate words need to be used, without expressing any anger/hatred or providing any negative comments/feedback.
  • In case of replying to any personal grievances/cases, response should be something like this: “Regarding your query/grievance, we have messaged you. Please have a look.” In order to maintain privacy, for any personal grievances/issues, the replies should not be appearing in the timeline.
  • Monthly report of all your handle activities – tweets, retweets, replies/quotes should be prepared and submitted to the head of the concerned government authority.
  • Official(s) responsible for handling twitter account need to engage with other similar government handles – following them, liking and sharing their content, informing about important updates using twitter features; creating a message group of similar handles for easy and effective communication.
  • Official(s) responsible for handling twitter account need to only follow appropriate and relevant handles that concern the agency’s work nature.

Operation and Management of Facebook Pages

  • All government agencies need to set up Facebook page and bring into operation.
  • Official emails should be used for username. For eg for Office of Prime Minister and Council of Ministers officials, undersecretary@opmcm.gov.np).
  • For the profile picture of the Facebook page, official logo of the agency or of the Government of Nepal needs to be used.
  • The cover image of the page should distinctly represent the government agency.
  • The page details should provide complete official information about the agency (such as full name, objectives, website address).
  • Name of the page should appropriately represent the government agency.
  • The concerned agency needs to apply for page verification after some time of the operation of the page.
  • All notices and information should be posted in the Facebook page on timely and regular basis.
  • All features – like, share, reply, message should be appropriately used by the officials.
  • Replies, mentions, shares demeaning any individuals or causing negative effect upon them should be avoided.
  • While replying to any mentions or comments, appropriate words need to be used, without expressing any anger/hatred or providing any negative comments/feedback.
  • In case of replying to any personal grievances/cases, response should be something like this: “Regarding your query/grievance, we have messaged you. Please have a look.” In order to maintain privacy, for any personal grievances/issues, the replies should not be appearing on the wall of the page.
  • Monthly report of all your page activities – tweets, retweets, replies/quotes should be prepared and submitted to the head of the concerned government authority.
  • Official(s) responsible for handling Facebook page need to engage with other similar government pages – following them, liking and sharing their content, informing about important updates using Facebook features; creating a message group of similar handles for easy and effective communication.
  • Official(s) responsible for handling Facebook page need to only follow appropriate and relevant pages that concern the agency’s work nature.
  • The queries/concerns received in the Facebook page will be addressed by the concerned ministerial grievance management committee.

Operation and Management of Viber Accounts

  • All government agencies need to set up Viber account and bring into operation.
  • To bring into operation Viber services, mobile numbers of the office of the agency needs to be used.
  • For the profile picture of the Viber account, official logo of the agency or of the Government of Nepal needs to be used.
  • The account details should provide complete official information about the agency (such as full name, objectives, website address).
  • Name of the page should appropriately represent the government agency.
  • The viber account needs to be available during office hours in each working day to make it operational for public use.
  • Appropriate responses should be provided to the queries/concerns by the public using the viber account.
  • All Viber features should be appropriately used by the officials.
  • Responses demeaning any individuals or causing negative effect upon them should be avoided.
  • While replying to any comments in the voice/video calls or messages, appropriate words need to be used, without expressing any anger/hatred or providing any negative comments/feedback.
  • In case of replying to any personal grievances/cases, response should be something like this: “Regarding your query/grievance, we have messaged you. Please have a look.” In order to maintain privacy, for any personal grievances/issues, the replies should not be appearing on the wall of the page.
  • Monthly report of all your account activities – messages and responses should be prepared and submitted to the head of the concerned government authority.
  • All contact numbers received from the Viber account needs to be saved along with the identity of the users.
  • Official(s) responsible for handling Viber account need to engage with other similar government Viber accounts – following them, liking and sharing their content, informing about important updates using Facebook features; creating a message group of similar handles for easy and effective communication.
  • Official(s) responsible for handling Viber account need to only follow appropriate and relevant pages that concern the agency’s work nature.
  • The queries/concerns received in the Viber account will be addressed by the concerned ministerial grievance management committee.

Other Provisions mentioned in the Procedures

  • Blocking/restricting users spreading hate messages against religion, caste/ethnicity or any particular group, using inappropriate language, posting obscene photos/videos – as per the decision by the social media management committee of the government agency.
  • Human resource management for social media account operation and management: In order to operate and manage social media accounts, the required human resources need to be identified and mobilised accordingly. Those professionals who are experienced in handling social media accounts and skilled in external communications and public relations need to be recruited for this responsibility.
  • The recruited professionals need to be properly oriented about their roles and responsibilities and should be provided with written Job Description for their role.
  • In case the person responsible for handling the social media account(s) is on leave, s/he needs to provide login details to other members of the account management team to continue operating the accounts in his/her absence.
  • In order to address the grievances, suggestions provided by the public users, a grievance/issue management committee needs to be developed and appropriate immediate actions need to be taken accordingly.
  • In order to make information and public services more accessible and effective to public, government of Nepal can start its own public interaction platforms other than the social media accounts.
  • Facebook Account/Page Procedures 2072 has been dismissed and will be replaced by this Social Media Use for Government Agencies Procedures 2075. All government social accounts and pages developed under the previous procedures will now be regulated through the new procedure.

 

The original document in Nepali can be downloaded here:

Understanding research respondents: My bitter experience with a boater

By Sandhya Pradhan

With full of excitement and energy, we headed towards the ‘heart city/lake city’ of Nepal: Pokhara. Breathtaking view of Phewa Lake and getting chance to breath in fresh air away from the pollution of Kathmandu got me more recharged. Walking down the Lakeside and mesmerizing view filled me with more encouragement to do my field survey. I headed towards the Lakeside approaching a boater but as soon as I talked to him, all my encouragement and confidence dipped. It felt something like boat sinking deeper into the lake. It was not even half a minute that I started talking to him. His reaction gave me goosebumps. In that bright sunny day his reaction made to feel like lying on the ground and counting the stars.

When I approached the boater requesting him to participate for my survey, his immediate response upon my request was as such: “अरुको दु:खको बारेमा लेखेर, दुनियाँलाई देखाएर अनि हजुरहरुले नम्बर पाउनुहुन्छ । हाम्रो दु:ख किन दुनियाँलाई देखाउने?” (“You get marks by showing our misery to the world. Why should we show our misery to the entire world?”)

Reflecting upon what we are currently studying in Development Communications course for our Bachelor in Development Studies (BDevS) degree, I felt that there was lack in understanding the audience on my part, thus creating a barrier to audience engagement. Perhaps be the respondent (boater) was not an interested respondent for my survey. And if there was another interested respondent, may be there would be more friendly behaviour who would be responsive to our queries?  I kept wondering about this. Since the respondent was busy in his daily routine trying to earn some money to feed his family, sparing some of his precious time to talk to me could have resulted him in losing some of the customers. Not getting a customer for him is not earning. So money could have also been an important factor for the boater’s disinterest.

Knowingly or unknowingly, I applied the modernization paradigm of development communications of using my authority, power and privilege, applying top-down vertical communication approach. One of the assumptions of the modernization paradigm is the influence of audience at the technocratic level – in my case the respondent to be inquisitive, guided by faith in the scientific method and rooted in the principles of enlightenment.  My assumption clearly did not work as the respondent (boater) wasn’t interested or curious at all about what I was asking or the outcome of the survey.

That day, I learnt a lot about audience engagement, demand and supply of research.

About the Author

Sandhya Pradhan NepalcommsWith so much to experience and so less to express, Sandhya is an enthusiast who believes in honest expression of emotions. Sandhya Pradhan is currently doing her Bachelor in Development studies from National College. She has a great volunteerism sprit and has worked as a volunteer in many organizations. She is someone who is fond of exploring new things. She is an environmental enthusiast, looking forward to work in the environment sector.

Cover Photo Credit : pokharacity.com

Teen Ghumti Book Review

When gender norms are broken: Book Review of ‘Teen Ghumti’

By Shreni Rajbhandary

Teen Ghumti is a novel written by B.P Koirala set during the Panchayat regime. Considered to be one of the most charismatic political leaders of Nepal, Koirala was also one of the most well-read and thoughtful writers of Nepali literature. This novel is about a girl and the three stages of her life that have been depicted through the character Indramaya. Indramaya has been portrayed as a strong courageous and resilient woman who fights for herself and makes decisions that change the way her life works.

In the first phase or ghumti of the story, we are shown the general perspective of a woman in Nepali society. Our patriarchal society has many established ways in which female members are supposed to act or behave in order to be accepted; so that she can live in the society with decorum. If she does not follow these social norms, she is tormented and boycotted from the societal sphere.

In the novel, Indramaya belongs to an ethnic Newar family which supported the king and his autocratic rule. She fell in love with Pitambar- a devoted Brahmin involved with a group of revolutionaries who were planning protests against the autocratic rule. Since the two were from two different worlds, her family did not agree with their love or marriage. Her father created a ‘Lakshman Rekha’ which she couldn’t cross and if she did she’d be considered as dead for her family. But for her love she defied her parents, she did not think about what the society would think about her or how they would treat her. All that she could think of was love. Thus, she parted from the society that created boundaries for her love. This was the first decision that she made which brought changes in her life.

In the second phase or ghumti of the story, we are shown how women are pictured to be breadwinners only and how the male counterparts consider themselves the breadwinners of the family. Women are expected do each and every household errands with utmost diligence. Conversely, they do not have right to speak or express themselves. If they do, the males feel debased thus, are asked to remain silent. It’s always about men and their rights, always. They are not given the love, attention and affection they deserve. Their requirements are not kept in mind and after marriage. Society tends to curse  a woman when is not able to give birth to a child. She is thought to be a disgrace and has to bear the burden alone.

Indramaya’s yearnings are not fulfilled by her husband until Pitambar gets arrested. Ramesh – Pitambar’s friend takes care of her. He starts living with her and soon falls in love. Though she rejects his advances initially, she eventually gives in. They are both attracted towards each other. Their relationship leads to Indira’s pregnancy. This is her second decision where she decides to ditch on her legitimate conjugal life. This is not at all acceptable, whether by the society or by her own spouse. The society thinks that she is the only and only person responsible for having a physical relationship with another man. Nobody risked giving her a shoulder. She was all-alone throughout her pregnancy.

In the third phase or ghumti of the story, her husband is released from the prison, exactly when she is giving birth to her daughter (Rama). Pitambar despite living under the same roof did not melt by her innocence and did not consider Ramesh’s daughter as his own. Indramaya suffered a lot, as nothing is more important to a mother than her child. She then decides to take the third ghumti; she decides to leave her hearth along with Rama and chooses to be a mother than a wife.

At 45, she is a single mother and independent. She is aware of the fact that her daughter (Rama) is in love with a guy. She unlike any other mother reacts in a bold and supportive manner and chooses to break the norm. After all that she had faced in her life, she knows that oppressing Rama’s feelings will do no good. At this age, she has a reminiscence of her old days; she has the reminiscence of the three major metamorphic decisions made.

Conclusion:

This novel by Koirala set during the Panchayat regime vividly depicts how a woman has turned her despairs into prosperity and bravely nurtured hope and struggle to cultivate a brighter future. It has been brilliantly written to describe the transcendent injustices in Nepali society for women and shows us the power and resilience of a woman who had every reason to give up but never did. This book has raised the conscience of many including me and has made its readers understand the many reasons of oppression of women despite covering half the sky.

There’s movie based on the novel. Here’s a review of it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XffthCuCi8M

References:

https://thehimalayantimes.com/entertainment/movie-review/uncaptivating-teen-ghumti/

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13722772-teen-ghumti

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5642582/ https://www.reddit.com/r/Nepal/comments/48lhif/teentin_ghumti_moviemorale_of_the_story/

Cover Image Source: GulmiResunga.com

About the Contributor

Shreni Rajbhandary

The terms “Social butterfly and environmental enthusiast” best defines Shreni Rajbhandary. Shreni is doing her Bachelor in Development Studies from National College. At 20 years of age, she is an entrepreneur and the youngest serving executive board member at Youth Thinkers’ Society (YTS). Moreover, she is US Embassy Youth Council alumni. She is also a prominent speaker who has spoken in BBC thrice representing Nepal. She is also passionate about writing and is currently a contributing writer at Smart family and Shine. She has a great volunteerism spirit with volunteering experiences at 8 years and many other notable organizations.